Tsunami Earthquake Appeal Fund: First Spending Figures Announced

16/03/2005

The Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) today said that to date it has allocated over £112 million of its Tsunami Earthquake Appeal fund for the first phase of disaster relief in Asia, funding work that is benefiting an estimated 3.6 million people.

The remainder of the £300 million Appeal fund will be spent on reconstruction and re-establishing livelihoods over at least three years. DEC agencies are in discussions with governments, the United Nations and local people on how best to allocate these funds.

Their plans for longer-term work will be submitted to the DEC at the end of April, and decisions agreed in May. The DEC will then release more detailed spending plan figures.

DEC Chief Executive Brendan Gormley said: "The magnificent fund created by the British public is making a real difference to over three million people, saving lives in the short term and rebuilding communities and livelihoods in the longer-term."

Figures published on the DEC website show that:

  • In India, over £23 million is benefiting over half a million people.
  • In Indonesia, almost £40 million is benefiting an estimated two million people.
  • In Sri Lanka, almost £41 million is benefiting over 1 million people.
  • In the Maldives, almost £1 million is befitting at least 3000 people.
  • In Somalia and east Africa, over £3.5 million is benefiting over 40,000 people.
  • In Thailand over £1 million is benefiting over 40,000 people.

DEC agencies have been working with local people, providing food, shelter, sanitation, fresh water, and everyday items like cooking utensils, soap and blankets. This work is one aspect of a massive international response. The DEC agencies are focusing on the delivery of professional, high-quality relief in liaison with local leadership and people.

The DEC is committed to spending the Appeal fund wisely and well despite the scale and complexity of the challenge. It will regularly report back on progress. Updates are published on its website www.dec.org.uk and on the websites of the DEC agencies.

ENDS